The 2014 Typographical Translation Award Winner

The_2014_Typographical_Translation_Award

8 Books
8 Publishers
7 Countries
5 Languages
1 Winner

And the winner of the second annual Typographical Translation Award is…

TexasTexas: The Great Theft!

Holy shit. That was a close race. In fact, up until yesterday morning it seemed like any one of three different books could claim the prize, but in the final hours Texas went from third to first and won it all.

Congratulations to author Carmen Boullosa, translator Samantha Schnee, and publisher Deep Vellum. They’ll each receive one of our gold plated brass miniature vintage typewriters as a reward.

If you haven’t read Texas: The Great Theft yet, now would be an excellent time to check it out. Trust us, you won’t be disappointed.

typewriter


Congratulations once again to all of the nominated titles. 2014 was a pretty solid year for literary translations. If you’re a fan of world literature and you’re looking for your next great read, you really can’t go wrong with any of these impressive works.

Shortlist:

With My Dog Eyes
by Hilda Hilst
Translated from the Portuguese by Adam Morris
Melville House

Harlequin’s Millions
by Bohumil Hrabal
Translated from the Czech by Stacey Knecht
Archipelago

Faces in the Crowd
by Valeria Luiselli
Translated from the Spanish by Christina MacSweeney
Coffee House Press

The Man With the Compound Eyes
by Wu Ming-yi
Translated from the Chinese by Darryl Sterk
Pantheon

Talking to Ourselves
by Andres Neuman
Translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor and Lorenza Garcia
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Guyana
by Elise Turcotte
Translated from the French by Rhonda Mullins
Coach House Books

The Book of Sins
by Chen Xiwo
Translated from the Chinese by Nicky Harman
Forty-Six

Longlist:

Baboon
by Naja Marie Aidt
Translated from the Danish by Denise Newman
Two Lines Press

The Symmetry Teacher
by Andrei Bitov
Translated from the Russian by Polly Gannon
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

The Corpse Exhibition
by Hassan Blasim
Translated from the Arabic by Jonathan Wright
Penguin

A Little Lumpen Novelita
by Roberto Bolano
Translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer
New Directions

The Author and Me
by Eric Chevillard
Translated from the French by Jordan Stump
Dalkey Archive Press

1914
by Jean Echenoz
Translated from the French by Linda Coverdale
The New Press

Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay
by Elena Ferrante
Translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein
Europa Editions

The Hunting Gun
by Yasushi Inoue
Translated from the Japanese by Michael Emmerich
Pushkin Press

F
by Daniel Kehlmann
Translated from the German by Carol Janeway
Pantheon

My Struggle Book Three: Boyhood
by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett
Archipelago

Summer House With Swimming Pool
by Herman Koch
Translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett
Hogarth

Why I Killed My Best Friend
by Amanda Michalopoulou
Translated from the Greek by Karen Emmerich
Open Letter Books

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage
by Haruki Murakami
Translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel
Knopf

Natural Histories
by Guadalupe Nettel
Translated from the Spanish by J. T. Lichtenstein
Seven Stories Press

The Light and the Dark
by Mikhail Shishkin
Translated from the Russian by Andrew Bromfield
Quercus

The Cold Song
by Linn Ullmann
Translated from the Norwegian by Barbara J. Haveland
Other Press

Write-In:

Dead Stars by Álvaro Bisama / Translated from the Spanish by Megan McDowell
The Guest Cat by Takashi Hiraide / Translated from the Japanese by Eric Selland
Captives by Norman Manea / Translated from the Romanian by Jean Harris
Nowhere People by Paulo Scott / Translated from the Portuguese by Daniel Hahn
Paris by Marcos Giralt Torrente / Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa
Snow and Shadow by Dorothy Tse / Translated from the Chinese by Nicky Harman


We’re all about transparency and we love statistics, so if you want to take a peek behind the curtain click here to visit the poll archive where you can view the final results from both the first and second rounds of voting. This year voting was down in both rounds, but the race was much tighter.


See you again next year? You bet!

About Aaron Westerman

Aaron Westerman is the Manager of Web Architecture for a national human services organization. When he's not busy tearing sites apart and rebuilding them, he spends his ever shrinking free time trying to keep up with his twins, reading works of translated literature, and watching far too many Oscar nominated movies.